WORKSTATION

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PuntWG, May 11 - 22
Wed - Sun, 13.00 - 18.00
Opening Wed May 11, 18.00 – 21.00

(as part of the West Wednesday route)

In the course of ten days, filmmakers, artists, participants of the workshop sessions and the general public are welcome to meet, hang out and discover more at our readingtable about the work of artists Rana Hamadeh, Donna Verheijden, Phil Collins, Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan and Ben Rivers at PuntWG art space. There will be stories to listen to from the series 'Harmless Poisons, Blameless Sins', by Ben Rivers, and we have on view the installation 'American Pain' by artist Wineke Gartz.

In line with the workshop sessions 'Rupture of Representation' on May 13-14-15, we will also host a series of intimate screenings and presentations over dinner at PuntWG on May 18-19-20.

More detailed information on screenings and presentations HERE

American Pain (2013)

American Pain started with a copy: while I was xerox copying the cover to the book 'A history of American Painting' the 'ting' fell off. 

American Pain involves an investigation of the American dream landscape in which Wineke Gartz speculates on a link between 19th Century American “Luminist” landscape paintings (by artists such as Thomas Cole) and Mohegan Sun, a Native American operated casino complex[i]. Gartz uses the Mohegan Sun Casino as a departure point to examine themes of entertainment, exploitation, and healing. In the arcadian setting of multi media viewpoints Gartz' puts together different content such as photocopies from research on American landscape paintings, and the tender drawings of Native American life by the Swiss explorer Rudolph Friedrich Kurz. In the soundtrack fragments of Miserere Mei, Deus sung by a choir is heard. The two videos in the work portray golden and red lit hallucinatory, sensual dreams, depicting the artist's body in red light. Central to the video imagery is how the artist twins the notions of oppression with the healing power of presence. Amongst these depictions, the artist uses scenes from Cole’s painting of the biblical story of Abel, whose murdered corpse she overlays onto her own body. Although the sources and subjects relating to American Pain seek to form a composite portrayal on a history of trauma and hope, it similarly evokes the irrational and the erotic.

[1]  Native American reservations stand outside of US federal law and therefore are allowed to build gambling establishments. Mohegan Sun’s interior refers to native american culture and symbols.

About the artist

Wineke Gartz

Wineke Gartz (born 1968, Eindhoven) is based in Amsterdam. Her site-specific installations consist of complex overlays of imagery and media, often with the use of music and multiple video and slides projections and with the integral use of the architectural space. Wineke Gartz work was presented at venues as the Busan Biennale in Busan, CCA in Kitakyushu, Artswestchester in White Plains, Festival Incubate in Tilburg, 3A Gallery and The Drawing Center in New York, and at Ellen de Bruijne Projects in Amsterdam.

 

 

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