Robert Doisneau: Through the Lens

Clémentine Deroudille
France | 2016 | 83 min

Premiere screening on 16 May at Rialto Amsterdam. In selected Dutch and Belgian cinemas in June 2018.

Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville is the title of a 1950 picture of a couple engaged in an intimate kiss, right in the middle of Paris. It is an iconic and clichéd image of a romantic Paris that never really existed. The image became one of the most iconic images in the history of photography and it made Robert Doisneau, the photographer who took it, an instant celebrity.

There is a certain irony here, because Doisneau (1912-1994) was not interested in clichés at all. His work is mainly dedicated to the ordinary, unremarkable people you meet on the street, in the cafes and on the market - people he always displayed with great respect.

Directed by Doisneau's granddaughter, Clémentine Deroudille, and featuring previously unreleased photographs and video archives as well as interviews with Doisneau friends and colleagues, ‘Robert Doisneau: Through the Lens’ tells the story of a humble man turned superstar photographer and a pioneer of photojournalism.

The film draws the intimate portrait of the life and work of an artist fiercely determined to be a purveyor of happiness, a man who always regarded himself as an outsider, just like many of the people he photographed.

Trailer

Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville.jpg

Press quotes

A warm look at the great French photographer. – LA Times

A portrait of an authentic artist. - Séquences - La Revue de Cinéma FR

Director Clémentine Deroudilles portrays the French photographer Robert Doisneau with charm and empathy, as a philanthropist who relied on illusions and produced clichés - a successful film tribute. – Kunst und Film DE

 

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